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Whether I serve in the Armed Forces, in federal or public office; the principles behind this degree will help shape the world to which I desire to make a better place, one day at a time.


Julio-Ceasar Basso
Norwich Graduate, Class of 2018

You are here

Master of Arts in Diplomacy

The world is ready for change. Are you ready to help change the world?

In today’s world, broad knowledge and specialized skills are required to build cooperation, defuse tension, and promote peace between and among nations, groups, and other entities. Our online Master of Arts in Diplomacy program helps you develop that skill set and prepares you to become an international problem solver in any sector, including public, private, nonprofit and the military.

A master’s degree in diplomacy from Norwich University carries weight. Our proud history as the nation’s first private military college and a long standing, unparalleled commitment to public service set our diplomacy program apart in academia and our graduates apart in the professional world.

 

 

Degree
  • Master of Arts
Concentrations
  • Cyber Diplomacy - Policy or Technical
  • International Commerce
  • International Conflict Management
  • International Terrorism

Why Norwich?


Develop skills to communicate more effectively within the complex international environment.

Gain a clear perspective on international diplomacy, leadership and conflict.

Tailor your diplomacy program studies based on your personal interests and career goals with 4 concentrations and the opportunity to pursue a thesis track.

Learn from and be mentored by expert faculty members, all of whom hold terminal degrees in their field.

Build a robust portfolio of research papers that you can leverage within your organization or submit as work samples to prospective employers.

Join a school with a nearly 200-year legacy and rich military history.

Apply to one of four start dates per year.

Benefit from a university recognized as offering Best Value with respect to high academic quality  and low net cost of attendance, according to the U.S. News & World Report.*

*Rankings are based on undergraduate programs and on students who received the average level of need-based financial aid.

Quick Info

1 Week Residency

Visit campus for culminating experience

15 Students

Maximum number of students per class

18 Months

Average time to program completion

4 March

Next Start Date

4 February

Application Deadline

Accreditation & Recognition

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Norwich University is accredited by the New England Commission of Higher Education (formerly the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.).

 

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Recognized for academic excellence, U.S. News & World Report ranks Norwich University in the top 100 for Regional Universities in the North. Rankings are based on undergraduate programs.

 

We're Here to Help


Kinshire  King
Admissions Advisor
Phone
1-800-460-5597 ext. 3356
Email

Curriculum

Online Master of Arts in Diplomacy Curriculum

Norwich’s online MDY program is made up of six courses, each of which is delivered over 11 for a total of 36 credit hours. Students master one course at a time, to create a strong foundation of knowledge and context for future topics.

Our graduates can:

  • Build cooperation, defuse tension, and promote peace between and among nations, groups, and other entities.
  • Develop a strong foundational understanding of diplomacy, diplomatic history, and the international system.
  • Focus on the area of diplomacy that is most relevant to your career path and educational goals.
  • Function effectively and manage teams across borders and in different kinds of organizations.

Core Curriculum

For the first course of the program, students have the option of choosing from either Theory and the International System (GD510) or The History of Diplomacy in the International System (GD511). All students in the diplomacy program will take Law and the International System (GD520) as their second course.

  • Theory and the International System
    GD510 6 credit hours

    You will review the basic theories that govern international relations and political science. The course also traces the historical evolution of diplomacy within the international system, providing a sense of its progression and an awareness of the milestones of diplomatic interaction within that system.

  • The History of Diplomacy in the International System
    GD511 6 credit hours

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of diplomacy, international relations, and world order in the context of the modern state system from 1648 to the present. The international political environment is introduced through studies in foreign policy decision making, combining history and political science in an analytical framework of historiography and international relations methodology.

  • Law and the International System
    GD520 6 credit hours

    You will explore the structure of the international system as defined by its rules and guidelines. The course presents an introduction to international law terminology and its history and theory. Laws surrounding conflict, war, war crimes, and the rising areas of international law, environmental law, and laws concerning humanitarian intervention will be explored. Of special interest will be laws pertaining to human rights.

Choose a Concentration in Diplomacy

After completing the core curriculum, you will choose a concentration that fits your career and professional goals.

International Commerce

Develop knowledge, competencies, and tools to deal with international populations including the public, government, media, online, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Seminar Three:
Economics and the International System (GD530)

Seminar Four:
Global Commerce and the International System (GD544)

Seminar Five:
Cross-Cultural Management in the International System (GD554)

Elective Options for Seminar Six:
Global Corporate Diplomacy (GD564)
Diplomacy and Communication (GD567)
Diplomacy in Practice (GD541)

  • Economics and the International System
    GD530 6 credit hours

    You will explore the international economic system, examine the impact of modernization within the system, and investigate the controversy over the concept of globalization and the debate of free trade versus protectionism. You will become familiar with the international financial network and its institutions. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues and the concept of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power.

  • Global Commerce and the International System
    GD544 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on internal and external environmental conditions affecting commerce in a global environment. You will evaluate the role of private-sector commerce in the international system and explore the impact of economics, law, politics, and culture on multinational commerce endeavors. You will also analyze country-specific data and internal organizational factors that influence managerial decision making in multinational organizations. You will gain an understanding of the global commerce environment and enhance your ability to function effectively across borders.

  • Cross-Cultural Management in the International System
    GD554 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on fundamental topics in human resources management as they pertain to globally active corporate, nonprofit, and governmental organizations. You will build skills in managing intercultural human resources differences; selecting, evaluating, and compensating employees in international assignments; training and developing expatriate employees; dealing with culture shock; and the effects of repatriation. You will be asked to apply the concepts of conflict management, resolution, and avoidance to specific work situations.

  • Global Corporate Diplomacy
    GD564 6 credit hours

    The course addresses the dependence of international commerce upon public goodwill, the development of which is the function of corporate diplomacy. You will develop the knowledge, competencies, and tools for implementing strategic communications in order to deal effectively with international constituencies, including the government, the news media, the Internet, and NGOs. Special emphasis will be given to developing and applying analytical skills to shape public opinion, build corporate reputation, and deal with crisis in a cross-cultural environment.

  • Diplomacy and Communication
    GD567 6 credit hours

    This course examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

  • Diplomacy in Practice
    GD541 6 credit hours

    The seminar provides an understanding of the methods, institutions and practices that allow nations to translate foreign policy objectives and strategies into practical actions and how practitioners adjust and refine foreign policy in response to the events that influence outcomes.

    The course is based on a practitioner’s perspective on diplomacy. The emphasis is on foreign policy practices and structures of the U.S., but it has broad applicability to the study of the diplomatic practice of other nations that operate in an analogous domestic political environment of a separation of powers, relative openness, and the freedom of expression.

International Terrorism

Examine the role of state-sponsored terrorism within the international community.

Seminar Three:
Economics and the International System (GD530)

Elective Options for Seminar Four:
Terrorism: Introduction and State-Sponsored Terrorism (GD542)
International Security (GD546)

Elective Options for Seminar Five:
International Terrorisim by Non-State Actors (GD552)
International Security (GD546)

Elective Options for Seminar Six:
International Response to Transnational Terrorism (GD562)
Diplomacy and Communications (GD567)
Diplomacy in Practice (GD541)

  • Economics and the International System
    GD530 6 credit hours

    You will explore the international economic system, examine the impact of modernization within the system, and investigate the controversy over the concept of globalization and the debate of free trade versus protectionism. You will become familiar with the international financial network and its institutions. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues and the concept of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power.

  • Terrorism: Introduction and State-Sponsored Terrorism
    GD542 6 credit hours

    This course examines how states have used terrorism as a tool in managing their international relations and evaluates actions that the international community has taken to deter state-sponsored terrorism. Case studies will complement theory and allow for comparative analyses of various actions taken by the international community and the results achieved to date.

  • International Security
    GD546 6 credit hours

    This course surveys some of the major debates and topics in international security. It is designed to give students an understanding of the most important substantive areas in the field of international security and to connect it with academic research on security‐related issues to policy. The course will examine both traditional understandings of and approaches to international security. New actors and issues considered relevant since the end of the Cold War will be discussed. The tension between the relative importance of traditional approaches to security, interstate relations, and the relevance or impact of less immediate but important influences such as human security and climate change will also be examined.

  • International Terrorism by Non-State Actors
    GD552 6 credit hours

    This course examines the phenomenon of transnational terrorism by non-state actors. Ideology, psychology, and strategies of major transnational groups are addressed to provide an understanding of their long-term goals and operations. You will examine the relationship of terrorist groups, WMD proliferation, and organized crime, as well as possible future trends in terrorist operations. Case studies of key groups will provide comparative analysis.

  • International Response to Transnational Terrorism
    GD562 6 credit hours

    This course surveys the strategies and policies that have been deployed by states to combat transnational terrorism. You will examine the development of international law as a tool against terrorism, diplomatic and multilateral approaches in dealing with cross-border issues, and government policies designed to improve internal and multinational coordination and cooperation. Differences and commonalities among states in their approaches to terrorism are highlighted in order to examine best practices.

  • Diplomacy and Communication
    GD567 6 credit hours

    This course examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

  • Diplomacy in Practice
    GD541 6 credit hours

    The seminar provides an understanding of the methods, institutions and practices that allow nations to translate foreign policy objectives and strategies into practical actions and how practitioners adjust and refine foreign policy in response to the events that influence outcomes.

    The course is based on a practitioner’s perspective on diplomacy. The emphasis is on foreign policy practices and structures of the U.S., but it has broad applicability to the study of the diplomatic practice of other nations that operate in an analogous domestic political environment of a separation of powers, relative openness, and the freedom of expression.

International Conflict Management

Address the multiple schools of debate concerning the causes of international conflict and war and assess conflict in all its forms.

Seminar Three:
Economics and the International System (GD530)

Elective Options for Seminar Four:
Conflict Avoidance, Prevention and Containment in the International System (GD540)
International Security (GD546)

Elective Options for Seminar Five:
Conflict Resolution and Post-Conflict Reconstruction in the International System (GD550)
International Security (GD546)

Elective Options for Seminar Six:
Military Intervention and Conflict Management in the International System (GD560)
Human Rights and Conflict in the International System (GD561)
Diplomacy and Communication (GD567)
Diplomacy in Practice (GD541)

  • Economics and the International System
    GD530 6 credit hours

    You will explore the international economic system, examine the impact of modernization within the system, and investigate the controversy over the concept of globalization and the debate of free trade versus protectionism. You will become familiar with the international financial network and its institutions. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues and the concept of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power.

  • Conflict Avoidance, Prevention and Containment in the International System
    GD540 6 credit hours

    This course addresses the multiple schools of debate concerning the causes of conflict and war. You will investigate the increasingly controversial area of peacekeeping and peacemaking, and examine transnational forces, including NGOs, that use diplomacy as a tool to avoid conflict in the international system. The concept of multilateral peace enforcement will be reviewed in order to examine best practices.

  • International Security
    GD546 6 credit hours

    This course surveys some of the major debates and topics in international security. It is designed to give students an understanding of the most important substantive areas in the field of international security and to connect it with academic research on security‐related issues to policy. The course will examine both traditional understandings of and approaches to international security. New actors and issues considered relevant since the end of the Cold War will be discussed. The tension between the relative importance of traditional approaches to security, interstate relations, and the relevance or impact of less immediate but important influences such as human security and climate change will also be examined.

  • Conflict Resolution and Post-Conflict Reconstruction in the International System
    GD550 6 credit hours

    You will examine the do’s and don’ts of negotiating peace, its hazards, unexpected consequences, and lessons learned. Topics include the increasingly important area of recovery from atrocities through trials, truth commissions, and amnesty. You will also explore post-conflict governing, reestablishing the rule of law, the dominance of civil society, and the institutions of governance, as well as the politics and cultural impact of rebuilding, including the economic and financial costs.

  • Military Intervention and Conflict Management in the International System
    GD560 6 credit hours

    You will examine conflict in all its forms, including aspects of covert operations, psychological warfare, special operations, and limited warfare. The course also explores multinational coalitions and conflicts and the renewed emphasis on terrorism, including the use of chemical, biological, and nuclear agents. You will review special cases of civil war and collapsed state conflicts. You will also investigate the impacts of modern warfare, most notably on the environment.

  • Human Rights and Conflict in the International System
    GD561 6 credit hours

    In this course, you will probe the complicated connections between the protection and enforcement of human rights norms and the roots, unfolding, and termination of armed conflict. Borrowing from the fields of peace building, conflict resolution, diplomacy, and law, the course builds upon the themes of conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction developed in previous courses. You will explore how human rights abuses increase the likelihood of violent conflict and how a respect for the political, civil, economic, and social claims of individuals may repair and restore affected societies.

  • Diplomacy and Communication
    GD567 6 credit hours

    This course examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

  • Diplomacy in Practice
    GD541 6 credit hours

    The seminar provides an understanding of the methods, institutions and practices that allow nations to translate foreign policy objectives and strategies into practical actions and how practitioners adjust and refine foreign policy in response to the events that influence outcomes.

    The course is based on a practitioner’s perspective on diplomacy. The emphasis is on foreign policy practices and structures of the U.S., but it has broad applicability to the study of the diplomatic practice of other nations that operate in an analogous domestic political environment of a separation of powers, relative openness, and the freedom of expression.

Cyber Diplomacy Concentration – Policy Track

Study today’s fundamental issues, debates, and events in international relations pertinent to the world of cyberspace. The cyber policy coursework will be taught from the curriculum in Norwich's Master of Science in Information Security & Assurance program.

For the policy track, students will take the courses listed below:

Elective Options for Seminar Three:
Economics in the International System (GD530)
Conflict Avoidance, Prevention and Containment in the International System (GD540)
Terrorism: Introduction and State-Sponsored Terrorism (GD542)
Global Commerce and the International System (GD544)
Global Corporate Diplomacy (GD564)
Human Rights and Conflict in the International System (GD561)
Diplomacy and Communication (GD567)

Elective Options for Seminar Four:
Cyber Policy I (GD547)
Cyber Crime (GI556)
Cyber Law (GI557)

Elective Options for Seminar Five:
Cyber Policy II (GD557)
Critical Infrastructure Protection (GI566)
International Perspectives on Cyberspace (GI567)

Seminar Six:
Cyber Diplomacy (GD568)

  • Economics and the International System
    GD530 6 credit hours

    You will explore the international economic system, examine the impact of modernization within the system, and investigate the controversy over the concept of globalization and the debate of free trade versus protectionism. You will become familiar with the international financial network and its institutions. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues and the concept of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power.

  • Conflict Avoidance, Prevention and Containment in the International System
    GD540 6 credit hours

    This course addresses the multiple schools of debate concerning the causes of conflict and war. You will investigate the increasingly controversial area of peacekeeping and peacemaking, and examine transnational forces, including NGOs, that use diplomacy as a tool to avoid conflict in the international system. The concept of multilateral peace enforcement will be reviewed in order to examine best practices.

  • Terrorism: Introduction and State-Sponsored Terrorism
    GD542 6 credit hours

    This course examines how states have used terrorism as a tool in managing their international relations and evaluates actions that the international community has taken to deter state-sponsored terrorism. Case studies will complement theory and allow for comparative analyses of various actions taken by the international community and the results achieved to date.

  • Global Commerce and the International System
    GD544 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on internal and external environmental conditions affecting commerce in a global environment. You will evaluate the role of private-sector commerce in the international system and explore the impact of economics, law, politics, and culture on multinational commerce endeavors. You will also analyze country-specific data and internal organizational factors that influence managerial decision making in multinational organizations. You will gain an understanding of the global commerce environment and enhance your ability to function effectively across borders.

  • Global Corporate Diplomacy
    GD564 6 credit hours

    The course addresses the dependence of international commerce upon public goodwill, the development of which is the function of corporate diplomacy. You will develop the knowledge, competencies, and tools for implementing strategic communications in order to deal effectively with international constituencies, including the government, the news media, the Internet, and NGOs. Special emphasis will be given to developing and applying analytical skills to shape public opinion, build corporate reputation, and deal with crisis in a cross-cultural environment.

  • Human Rights and Conflict in the International System
    GD561 6 credit hours

    In this course, you will probe the complicated connections between the protection and enforcement of human rights norms and the roots, unfolding, and termination of armed conflict. Borrowing from the fields of peace building, conflict resolution, diplomacy, and law, the course builds upon the themes of conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction developed in previous courses. You will explore how human rights abuses increase the likelihood of violent conflict and how a respect for the political, civil, economic, and social claims of individuals may repair and restore affected societies.

  • Diplomacy and Communication
    GD567 6 credit hours

    This course examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

  • Cyber Policy I
    GD547 6 credit hours

    This course deals with vulnerabilities of computer networks and techniques for protecting networks and data, basic elements of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, secure e-commerce, involving secure transmission, authentication, digital signatures, digital certificates and Public Key Infrastructure (PKI), as well as issues in privacy and piracy. The course also addresses basic definitions and nomenclature in the area of security assessment, risk analysis derived from actual cases. Students are expected to use critical thinking skills as they go through the material rather than accepting facts at face value.

  • Cyber Crime
    GI556 6 credit hours

    This course explores the nature of conflict in cyber space focusing on two major Internet-based threats to the U.S. national security: cyber terrorism and cyber crime. The course addresses questions such as: who is undertaking these cyber activities, what techniques do they use, and what countermeasures can be adopted to mitigate their impact. The course is built around a risk management framework to help information leaders leverage the benefits of Internet technologies while minimizing the risks that such technologies pose to their organizations.

  • Cyber Law
    GI557 6 credit hours

    This course explores a broad variety of federal statutory, common, and international laws that may impact the information technology professional. Because the overwhelming majority of cyber infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector, the course focus is on those laws that affect the interaction between government and the private sector information technology industry, including the privacy rights so often implicated in modern data storage systems. The course starts with a look at “cyber law” and whether it is really a distinct legal discipline at all. It then moves into criminal, civil, regulatory, international and common laws with which today’s information technology professional may come in contact. Throughout the course we discuss how public policy and other factors impact the development, implementation, and interpretation of the law. Students read, interpret and apply legal authorities and theories, a valuable skill for future information technology leaders if they are to stay in compliance with the ever-growing “cyber” legal framework.

  • Cyber Policy II
    GD557 6 credit hours

    The course introduces sociological and psychological issues in policy implementation, and as they relate to information security specific policies. It explores the psychology of the attacker, examines the motivation and techniques of cyber criminals and hackers, and stresses the importance of the user in the success of security systems. The course introduces basic perceptual, cognitive, and motivational processes and biases that compromise security and increase vulnerability to attacks. Interaction of humans with machines and technology and its effects on security in organizations is also discussed. The course addresses the entire lifecycle of policy creation and enactment and presents issue specific policies in different domains of security. The structure of the policy is also discussed to assist in design and modification of policies. Several examples from different domains are incorporated to provide context of real life situations. This course also examines the tools and techniques of cyber-attacks that are common to cyber warfare, cyber espionage, cyber terrorism and cyber activism and efforts to control or mitigate the threat of cyber warfare through diplomacy, arms control treaties and confidence building measures, as well it discusses key impediments to cooperation such as policy differences among states over Internet governance, censorship, data protection and privacy.

  • Critical Infrastructure Protection
    GI566 6 credit hours

    This course examines the security of information in computer and communications networks within infrastructure sectors critical to national security. These include the sectors of banking, securities and commodities markets, industrial supply chain, electrical/smart grid, energy, transportation, communications, water supply and health. Special attention is paid to the risk management of information in critical infrastructure environments through an analysis and synthesis of assets, threats, vulnerabilities, impacts, and countermeasures. Critical consideration is paid to the role of Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems in the flow of resources such as electricity, water, and fuel.

  • International Perspectives on Cyberspace
    GI567 6 credit hours

    This course provides an overview of the issues surrounding transnational cyberspace policies, international investment strategies, and implementation of communication and information technologies that affect the global economy and transforms the flow of information across cultural and geographic boundaries. The course will examine various global governance frameworks, and organizations that shape and transform cyberspace such as the International Telecommunications Union, the World Bank Information and Communications Technology Sector and the U.S. Federal Communications Commission.

  • Cyber Diplomacy
    GD568 6 credit hours

    This course provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles relevant to the work or career goals of each student. Each student researches and prepares a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to challenges or issues of contemporary international importance and relevance in cyber diplomacy. The final outcome of the seminar for each student is a paper suitable for publication in a professional or an academic journal. Students are required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, analysis, and effective writing skills. Course assignments maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information.

  • Studies in Cyber Systems I
    GD548 6 credit hours

    This course addresses computer forensics investigation as prescribed by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). It introduces computer forensics concepts, as well as techniques for identifying, collecting, preserving and triaging digital evidence consistent with industry standards and best practices, as well as, assorted hardware and software utilized by computer forensic practitioners. The course will also examine operational considerations of cyber warfare and a battlefield perspective with real incident data sets to illustrate different incident analysis techniques. Also discussed are management of computer security incidents, including detailing different types of incidents, identification, preparation, and analysis of incidents, gathering of evidence, recovery and follow-up. It teaches how to implement security in networks, how to harden their information security environment and set up secure infrastructure. The course covers both wired and wireless network security, database security, and general computer security practices.

Cyber Diplomacy – Technical Track

  • Economics and the International System
    GD530 6 credit hours

    You will explore the international economic system, examine the impact of modernization within the system, and investigate the controversy over the concept of globalization and the debate of free trade versus protectionism. You will become familiar with the international financial network and its institutions. Special attention will be given to Third World development issues and the concept of economics as a tool of diplomacy and military power.

  • Conflict Avoidance, Prevention and Containment in the International System
    GD540 6 credit hours

    This course addresses the multiple schools of debate concerning the causes of conflict and war. You will investigate the increasingly controversial area of peacekeeping and peacemaking, and examine transnational forces, including NGOs, that use diplomacy as a tool to avoid conflict in the international system. The concept of multilateral peace enforcement will be reviewed in order to examine best practices.

  • Terrorism: Introduction and State-Sponsored Terrorism
    GD542 6 credit hours

    This course examines how states have used terrorism as a tool in managing their international relations and evaluates actions that the international community has taken to deter state-sponsored terrorism. Case studies will complement theory and allow for comparative analyses of various actions taken by the international community and the results achieved to date.

  • Global Commerce and the International System
    GD544 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on internal and external environmental conditions affecting commerce in a global environment. You will evaluate the role of private-sector commerce in the international system and explore the impact of economics, law, politics, and culture on multinational commerce endeavors. You will also analyze country-specific data and internal organizational factors that influence managerial decision making in multinational organizations. You will gain an understanding of the global commerce environment and enhance your ability to function effectively across borders.

  • Global Corporate Diplomacy
    GD564 6 credit hours

    The course addresses the dependence of international commerce upon public goodwill, the development of which is the function of corporate diplomacy. You will develop the knowledge, competencies, and tools for implementing strategic communications in order to deal effectively with international constituencies, including the government, the news media, the Internet, and NGOs. Special emphasis will be given to developing and applying analytical skills to shape public opinion, build corporate reputation, and deal with crisis in a cross-cultural environment.

  • Human Rights and Conflict in the International System
    GD561 6 credit hours

    In this course, you will probe the complicated connections between the protection and enforcement of human rights norms and the roots, unfolding, and termination of armed conflict. Borrowing from the fields of peace building, conflict resolution, diplomacy, and law, the course builds upon the themes of conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction developed in previous courses. You will explore how human rights abuses increase the likelihood of violent conflict and how a respect for the political, civil, economic, and social claims of individuals may repair and restore affected societies.

  • Diplomacy and Communication
    GD567 6 credit hours

    This course examines the role of communication in diplomatic endeavors. The historical influence of communication is considered along with the evolving theoretical basis that has informed diplomatic communication. In addition to examining the role communication has played throughout the history of diplomacy, key challenges related diplomatic communication will be considered. These include cultural challenges, the evolving nature of communication technology, the movement towards transparency, and the development of public diplomacy.

  • Studies in Cyber Systems I
    GD548 6 credit hours

    This course addresses computer forensics investigation as prescribed by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). It introduces computer forensics concepts, as well as techniques for identifying, collecting, preserving and triaging digital evidence consistent with industry standards and best practices, as well as, assorted hardware and software utilized by computer forensic practitioners. The course will also examine operational considerations of cyber warfare and a battlefield perspective with real incident data sets to illustrate different incident analysis techniques. Also discussed are management of computer security incidents, including detailing different types of incidents, identification, preparation, and analysis of incidents, gathering of evidence, recovery and follow-up. It teaches how to implement security in networks, how to harden their information security environment and set up secure infrastructure. The course covers both wired and wireless network security, database security, and general computer security practices.

  • Computer Security Incident Response Team Management
    GI554 6 credit hours

    In this course, you will analyze and apply the key points in creating and managing a computer security incident response team (CSIRT), also known as a computer incident response team (CIRT) or a computer emergency response team (CERT). Topics include establishing CSIRTs; responding to computer emergencies; securing the CSIRT; managing the CSIRT with respect to professionalism, setting priorities for triage, and protecting personnel against burnout; and learning from emergencies using the incident postmortem and establishing continuous process improvement within the organization. Students will use their case study to apply their knowledge to real-world situations and will prepare recommendations for the establishment of a new CSIRT or improvement of their existing CSIRT.

  • Vulnerability Management and Penetration Testing I
    GI562 6 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the penetration testing of computer networks. Students will utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands‐on lab exercises, and learn to use the well‐known open‐source Metasploit computer security project to understand security vulnerabilities. Students will apply this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools, and learn how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise. Topics explored in this course include system security and vulnerability analysis, the most common system exploits and vulnerabilities, along with system “pivoting” and client‐side exploits. This course also introduces open‐source tools, in particular, the Metasploit Framework (MSF). Students will learn how to assess enterprise security controls and system vulnerability, and learn to document their findings. The course is designed for penetration testers, system security, and network administrators.

  • Studies in Cyber Systems II
    GD558 6 credit hours

    The course navigates sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. It discusses the need for mathematical models in different security paradigms along with the essential definitions, concepts and results for developing the models, their strengths and weaknesses, and, consequently, its application to practical problems. The course also addresses statistical methods for forensic accounting and assurance, internal controls and financial information systems, and auditing of modern complex accounting information systems.

  • Computer Forensic Investigation
    GI551 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on the spectrum of tools and techniques used to investigate digital incidents, whether in a civil or criminal environment. The course provides the broad understanding that information assurance professionals must have of the management, investigation, and analysis of digital incidents. It also places that understanding in the context of other information assurance domains. Discussions of digital investigation and forensics cover topics from both technical and management perspectives to increase the information assurance professional’s understanding and application of domain-specific knowledge.

  • Vulnerability Management and Penetration Testing II
    GI563 6 credit hours

    This course introduces students to advanced open-source tools used to conduct penetration testing of computer networks. Students will learn the rules of engagement, and how to conduct legal and ethical security tests and vulnerability assessments. Students will utilize a virtual lab to gain experience through hands-on lab exercises. Students will learn to use the well-known open-source tools (Metasploit , John the Ripper, Wireshark) to understand security vulnerabilities and how to use this tool for penetration testing, testing the control tools, and how to conduct monitoring of an enterprise.

  • Cyber Diplomacy
    GD568 6 credit hours

    This course provides students the opportunity to synthesize learning from all previous seminars and to apply the concepts and principles relevant to the work or career goals of each student. Each student researches and prepares a written capstone project that offers a practical or theoretical solution to challenges or issues of contemporary international importance and relevance in cyber diplomacy. The final outcome of the seminar for each student is a paper suitable for publication in a professional or an academic journal. Students are required to exhibit in-depth critical thinking, analysis, and effective writing skills. Course assignments maximize the exchange of student suggestions and comments on the various stages of the capstone project, to include but not limited to topic section, thesis, resources and supporting information.

Comprehensive Exam

A comprehensive exam is a requirement of the diplomacy program and is part of the graduation requirement. The exam will cover material from the entire program in a series of essay questions and is administered during the student's final course.

Optional Thesis Track

The thesis track is available for students who wish to have the traditional thesis experience with faculty mentorship and a culminating research paper, which is often the basis for a future publication. Outside of the degree completion requirements, students can choose to add this thesis after all six courses are completed. Pending program director approval for candidacy acceptance, your thesis will have a formal board of examination, supervision, and research process. Students who successfully defend a thesis may be exempt from the Comprehensive Exam requirement.

The thesis track is split into four 3-credit seminars: GD570, GD751, GD572, and GD573.

Residency

Our diplomacy program ends in a residency at the historic Norwich University campus in Vermont. During this time you will have the opportunity to meet with fellow students, faculty, and program staff in both formal classroom and informal settings. Academic recognition ceremonies and commencement cap off the week, and family and friends are encouraged to attend.

Norwich covers the cost of all meals and accommodation on campus.

 

Admissions

At a Glance

  • No GRE/GMAT required
  • Undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or higher

 

Admissions Requirements »

Next Start Date

Monday, March 4, 2019

Application Deadline

Monday, February 4, 2019

Contact Admissions

Mon - Thurs: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. EST
Friday: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. EST
Extended hours available by appointment

 

Call: 1-800-460-5597 ext. 3378 (U.S. and Canada)
Call: +1-647-722-6642 ext. 3378 (International)
Email: mdy@online.norwich.edu

  • transfer
    Transfer Credits
    You may receive the equivalent of up to 12 semester credits for study conducted elsewhere. Norwich complies with VA regulations and guidelines as it pertains to transfer credits.
  • international
    International Admissions
    Norwich University welcomes students from all countries who want to study through our online programs. You must complete all steps in the admissions process.
  • norwich alum, ben bragdon
    Norwich Alumni Benefits
    Reconnect with Norwich to complete your master's degree. As apart of our alumni community, you are eligible for a $2,500 scholarship and other benefits.

Non-Discrimination Statement

Norwich University, in compliance with Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, age, sex, or physical handicap in any of its policies, practices, or procedures.

Tuition & Fees

About

When applying for the Master of Arts in Diplomacy program at Norwich University, there are two essential factors to consider: what does it cost, and how can you pay for it? There are many ways to get financial assistance and several financial strategies that can help you achieve your academic and professional goals. We are here to help you identify and pursue the options that are best for you.

Tuition at a Glance

  • Credit Hours: 36
  • Cost Per Credit Hour: $751

2018-19 Tuition and Fee Schedule - Master's Programs

Rate Per Credit Term Tuition Additional Expenses Total
$751 $4,506

Technology - $300/term
Library - $75/term
Graduation - $150/one-time

$29,436

Careers & Outcomes

Career Opportunities for Master of Arts in Diplomacy Graduates

Our diplomacy program prepares students from diverse professional backgrounds for a wide range of careers. Our graduates have pursued a variety of roles, including:

Career Roles

  • Adjunct Professor
  • Ambassador
  • Attorney-Advisor
  • Border Patrol Intelligence
  • Communications Director
  • Government Relations Director
  • Intelligence Advisor
  • Lead Business Intelligence Analyst
  • News Director

Our alumni have attained positions at top organizations, including*:

Places of Work

  • Department of Defense
  • Internet Infrastructure Coalition
  • Iowa Department of Public Safety
  • Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Michelin Corporation
  • North Dakota State University
  • Stone & Associates
  • U.S. Army

What our graduates have to say*:

  • 83% feel their workplace skills have been enhanced since earning their online Diplomacy degree
  • 81% of responding Norwich University graduates who wanted to advance in their career said they were successful in doing so
  • 58% of Norwich University graduates in 2016 earned more than $80,000 per year.
  • Read more about our Master of Arts in Diplomacy student outcomes.

*Source: Norwich University Master of Arts in Diplomacy Graduate Survey, fielded March 2016

Where are Norwich Alumni Today?

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Nicole Foster

Diplomacy alumna runs for State Representative.

Class of 2008

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Edison Avilés Deliz

Alumnus appointed to a regulatory board by PR's governor.

Class of 2012

Star
Jeffrey Orzechowski

Named a fellow in the 34th class of the Robert Bosch Foundational Fellowship Program.

Class of 2015

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Thomas Garrett

Alumnus awarded Mongolia’s Medal of Friendship.

Class of 2010

Faculty & Staff

Our Master of Arts in Diplomacy program is led by dedicated faculty and staff members that are available to help you reach your academic, professional, and personal goals. Our faculty members hold terminal degrees in their field and are subject matter experts in the diplomacy field, including conflict management and resolution, international security, and global communications.

We have an in-house instructional design team that work hand-in-hand with program faculty and staff to ensure an efficient and interactive online learning experience in each course.

Program Director

lasha
Lasha Tchantouridzé, PhD

Dr. Lasha Tchantouridzé is Professor and Director of the graduate programs in Diplomacy and International Relations. He is also a Davis Center Associate, Harvard University, Boston, MA; Research Fellow, the Center for Defence and Security Studies, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada; and Advisory Board Member of Peace & War Center at Norwich University. He earned his PhD in International Relations from Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Dr. Tchantouridzé’s research interests are at the intersection of diplomacy and force in international politics, and his academic publications are in the areas of geopolitics, Russian foreign policy, Canadian foreign policy, the Arctic, the Black Sea basin, international politics in the Caucasus, and NATO-Russia relations.

Recent Publications:

“The Black Sea question in Russo-Turkish Relations,” in Contemporary Russo-Turkish Relations: From Crisis to Cooperation, ed. by Ali Askerov, Lexington Books, 2018.

“Contending Policies of Russia and Turkey: The Syrian Crisis,” co-authored with Ali Askerov, in Contemporary Russo-Turkish Relations: From Crisis to Cooperation, ed. by Ali Askerov, Lexington Books, 2018.

“Appeasement of Russia and the Return of Great Power Politics in Europe,” Eastern Europe – Regional Studies, Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017.

“საპარლამენტო სისტემის პრობლემები განვითარებადი დემოკრატიის პირობებში” (“Problems of the Parliamentary System in Developing Democracies,” in Georgian), პოლიტიკა (Politics), 2017, Vol. 1, No. 3.

“Unipolarity: End of an Error,” in Michael Hawes and Christopher Kirkey, eds. Canadian Foreign Policy in a Unipolar World. Toronto: Oxford University Press, 2016.

“Canada’s Northern Dilemma: Resurgent Russia and the Competition over the Arctic,” Asian Journal of Canadian Studies, Vol. 21, No. 2, fall 2014.

“Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan: Comparing Canadian and Soviet Efforts,” International Journal, a special issue: Canada and Afghanistan: a Political, Diplomatic, Security, Economic & Social Assessment, Volume LXVIII, No. 2, summer 2013.

“Unipolarity: Theories, Images, and Canada’s Foreign Policy Priorities” Canadian Foreign Policy Journal, Volume 18, Issue 2, 2012.

“Political Economy of Kyrgyzstan’s Domestic (In)Stability,” The Journal of Central Asian Studies, Srinagar, Kashmir, Vol. XX, No. 1, 2011, pp. 89-102. 

“Realpolitik and the Russo-Georgian War: Three Years On,” with Ryan Dessayn, Central Asia and the Caucasus 13 (1) 2012. 
In Russian: Лаша Чантуридзе и Р. Дессейнь, «Realpolitik и война России с Грузией: Три года спустя,»  Центральная Азия и Кавказ 15 (1), 2012.

“Canada and the New Russian-European Condominium,” Canadian Military Journal, Vol. 11, No. 3.
In French: “Le nouveau condominium russo-européen : Réévaluer les engagements pris par le Canada envers l’Europe en matière de défense,” Revue Militaire Canadienne, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2011.

Courses:

GD510 Theory and the International System
GD542 Terrorism: Introduction and State Sponsored Terrorism
GD560 Military Intervention and Conflict Management in the International System
IR510 World Politics – International Relations
IR531 National Security

Meet Lasha »

Program Staff

Charles  Lerche, PhD
Associate Program Director of Academics
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Kerri Murnyack, MA
Associate Program Director
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Jennifer  West, M.S.
Student Services Advisor

Featured Faculty

Faculty

Alumni

Get to know the graduates of Norwich’s online Master of Arts in Diplomacy program.

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Reading theory and case studies as I was living what I was reading while working for NATO and ISAF in Afghanistan was an amazing experience and kept me motivated on late night papers or group projects!


Rebecca Lloyd
Class of 2015
Master of Arts in Diplomacy
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This degree has enriched me beyond belief. I have become an educational role model for my daughters – its never too late or too hard to go after what you want.


Maria Grove
Class of 2017
Master of Arts in Diplomacy

The Norwich diplomacy master's program was the best fit to augment and formalize the experience and education I have received thus far as an Air Force officer. The program provided me a better foundation and broader perspective to understand and analyze world events.


Ryan Nichols
Class of 2014
Master of Arts in Diplomacy

Frequently Asked Questions

Diplomacy Program FAQs

What courses can I take in the diplomacy program?

Students can choose from a variety of courses specific to their interests in the field of international relations. Course topics include global commerce, international terrorism, human rights and conflict, and economics and the international system.

What concentrations may I specialize in?

Students can choose one of three concentrations: international commerce, international terrorism, or international conflict management.

Which international relations degree is right for you?

Diplomacy is a specific aspect of international relations. If your career goals involve the broader field of international affairs, explore our online Master of Arts in International Relations program.

Is there a thesis or independent study option?

The optional thesis track provides the opportunity for focused research and scholarly investigation in addition to your course work. If you wish to complete a thesis, you must present a formal application, and your candidacy must be accepted by the program director.

How long is the diplomacy program?

The program’s six courses (each six credits) take approximately 18 months to complete. Depending on when you start the program, you can expect your degree to be conferred in 18 to 24 months.

How have graduates of the diplomacy program applied their degree?

Our diplomacy alumni have found employment with a variety of public and private organizations including BAE Systems, Booz Allen Hamilton, the U.S. Army, CACI International, the Cato Institute, Grant Thornton LLP, Cable News Network, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing, the United Nations, the U.S. Department of State, and Wells Fargo.

How are the diplomacy program faculty members selected?

Diplomacy program instructors hold terminal degrees from established universities. They must demonstrate a wide range of university/college-level teaching experience, a strong research record, and solid, practical experience in international relations.

What are the eligibility requirements for applying to the program?
  • A bachelor's degree from a regionally or nationally accredited institution or an equivalent degree from a foreign institution, as evaluated by WES, IERF, SpanTran, or CED.
  • A GRE score is not required but may be requested based on your undergraduate GPA.
  • If English was not the language of previous degree study, proof of English language proficiency and minimum TOEFL scores of 550 (paper-based test) or 80 (Internet-based test, or iBT) are required unless otherwise noted in specific articulation agreements.
How much will this program cost?
  • Price per Credit: $751
  • Term Tuition: $4,506
  • Technology Fee — $300/term
  • Library Fee — $75/term
  • Graduation Fee — $150/one-time
  • Total Program Cost (6 terms): $29,436

 

Does Norwich accept transfer credits?

When you apply for admission to the online Diplomacy program, you can submit transcripts and course outlines from previously attended institutions of higher education to be considered for transfer credits. Transfer credits will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and may be accepted for up to 12 credits. Norwich complies with VA regulations and guidelines as they pertain to transfer credits.

Through an agreement between Norwich University and the Department of the Army/U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, up to six credit hours may be awarded toward completion of the MDY program requirements. Credit hours will be awarded in the Conflict Resolution Concentration for GD560 Military Intervention, or in the International Terrorism Concentration for GD562 International Response.

Learn more about Norwich University’s transfer credit policy.

 

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