christopher wrubel on norwich campus

Having earned my degree from a university with such a prestigious history as Norwich is something I will always be proud of.


Christopher Wrubel
Norwich Graduate, Class of 2014

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Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies

Developing Core Skills for Competitive Careers

Standing out from the crowd in an increasingly competitive job market or attaining a promotion at your current job may be difficult, but Norwich University’s Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies online degree program can provide you with the tools necessary to distinguish yourself from other applicants. No matter your current or desired career, the interdisciplinary studies program is designed to sharpen your skills in research and analysis, creative problem solving, and communication, thereby help prepare you for success.

The interdisciplinary studies program requires applicants to have at least 30 credit hours of prior college coursework or equivalent military or professional training, building upon this experience and applying it across major academic disciplines. Norwich’s flexible online classroom makes it easy for working adults to complete coursework on their own time, and the program is highly customizable depending on personal career goals. The program culminates in a capstone course in which you will combine at least two academic disciplines and demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach to research and analysis.

 

Degree
  • Bachelor
Concentrations
  • Justice Studies
  • Leadership Studies
  • Strategic Studies

Why Norwich?


Our approach to integrated curricula allows you to take courses in a wide range of subjects, as well as the opportunity to explore a specific topic of study in depth.

Transfer up to 90 semester credits and complete your degree in fewer than two years.

Flexible online platform offers you ability to complete coursework that fits your schedule.

Relevant electives, including Strategic Communications or Business and Professional Writing.

Quick Info

100% Online

All classes taken online

30 Credits

Entry Requirement

18 Months

Average time to program completion

29 October

Next Start Date

1 October

Application Deadline

Accreditation & Recognition

Norwich University is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. - the nation's oldest regional accrediting body - through its Commission on Institutions of Higher Education (CIHE). Regional Accreditation by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc.

We're Here to Help


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Sarah  DeBouter
Admissions Advisor
Phone
1-802-485-2263
Email

Curriculum

Interdisciplinary Studies Program Curriculum

The Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies is an upper-division transfer degree program designed for students with at least 30 credit hours of prior college coursework or its equivalent in eligible military or professional training. The program consists of four curriculum areas:

  • Elective courses are taken by all students who enter the program with fewer than 60 credits.
  • Core curriculum is comprised of six academic areas.
  • A concentration in a specialized area or discipline must be completed by all students.
  • Capstone project is the culminating synthesis of learning.

General Education

Students who enter the program with between 30 and 59 credits of prior coursework or the equivalent must complete general elective courses to reach the 60-credit threshold before moving into the core curriculum. Elective options are listed below.

  • Ethics in the Modern World
    PHLS210 3 credit hours

    This course is a study of ethics and its application to problems in everyday life, society, and the broader world. The course examines the principal moral theories and ethical systems that have shaped our personal values and behavior, including consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics. Students explore the connections between ethics and religion and examine the challenges to morals posed by relativism, subjectivism and emotivism, egoism. Students also evaluate positions, theories, and arguments as they apply them to concrete matters of personal, socio-political, and global concern.

  • Technology-Mediated Communication
    COMM315 3 credit hours

    A study of human communication and the effect of modern technology on it. Students review basic communication theory, including non-verbal and intercultural communication, and then evaluate the impact of technology on the effectiveness and efficiency of communication. Topics include: spoken vs. written communication; synchronous vs. asynchronous communication; the status of world languages on the internet; the impact of social media; modern workplace communication; and trends in the development of communication technology.

  • Socio-Economic Studies
    ECON310 3 credit hours

    In this course, you will explore tenets and characteristics of various economics systems, analyze economic indicators, conceptualize problems, and recommend possible solutions. Economic factors are explored in the context of the U.S. Army’s Political-Military-Economics-Social Infrastructure-Information Systems framework.

  • English Composition
    ENGL101 3 credit hours

    This course is devoted chiefly to the principles of written organization, exposition, argumentation, and research.

  • Crime in Literature
    ENGL250 3 credit hours

    In this course, students read and discuss works of literature that explore the ethical, social, and philosophical implications of criminal behavior and society's response to it. Prerequisite: Either EN102 or approval of the program manager.

  • History of the U.S. Constitution
    HIST210 3 credit hours

    A study of the political, economic, and social contexts of the creation of the Constitution and the significant amendments to it. Emphasis is on the role of the judicial branch in constitutional matters; the effects of social change in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries; and the impact of technology on contemporary constitutional issues.

  • Historical Studies
    HIST310 3 credit hours

    In this course students will identify strategic considerations which have influenced the outcome of political and military conflict. Topics including the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, the campaigns of Alexander the Great and Napoleon Bonaparte, the Anglo-Afghan wars of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the rise and fall of empires around the world.

  • Liberal Arts Mathematics
    MATH102 3 credit hours

    An investigation of mathematical concepts and methods with emphasis given to their impact on current and ancient problems. Topics include mathematics of voting systems, basic graph theory including Euler circuits and the traveling salesman problem, the mathematics of population growth, statistics, and finding fair shares. Emphasis is on techniques of problem solving.

  • Elementary Statistics
    MATH232 3 credit hours

    This course covers the study of frequency distributions, averages and standard deviations, normal curve, probability, decision-making, sampling techniques, testing hypotheses, chi-square, students-t and F-distributions, correlation, and linear regression. Prerequisite: A college level mathematics course or equivalent as determined by departmental placement testing. This course is not open to students with credit in MA311.

  • Leadership
    MNGT315 3 credit hours

    In this course, you will learn key theoretical models of leadership and strategies for applying them in a range of situations, both military and non-military. You will identify key functions and skills of effective leaders, explore leadership styles through study of selected leaders, and evaluate the role of communication, negotiation, strategy, purpose, and ethics in leadership. You will evaluate your own leadership effectiveness and develop a leadership tool kit.

  • Critical Thinking
    PHLS205 3 credit hours

    This course introduces students to the critical thinking skills and techniques needed in academic and research endeavors. Topics covered include formal and informal logic; the structure of logical systems; argumentation; and the relationship of logic to research and the scientific method. Emphasis is placed on learning to recognize common logical fallacies.

  • Comparative Religion
    RELG300 3 credit hours

    Based upon myth and built upon ritual, religious thought affects politics, economics, international relations, and security. In this course, you will explore and analyze the similarities and differences among world religions to better understand the impact of belief systems and religious themes on culture, human history, and current affairs. Prerequisites: none.

  • Environmental Science
    SCIE301 3 credit hours

    Most of the world’s crucial environmental issues and many regional conflicts are related to the degradation and/or overuse of the Earth’s basic resources, including air, water, soil, and energy. This course focuses on the physical and chemical processes associated with the degradation of these resources, as well as an examination of potential solutions. The course addresses and integrates into scientific studies two themes that underlie all environmental issues: sustainability and human population dynamics.

  • Military Sociology
    SOCI330 3 credit hours

    This course provides a sociological perspective of the military as both an institution and as an occupation. It examines the social structure and functions of the military and the social factors that influence behavior in and of the military. In terms of function, it examines the changing purposes of the military in view of changing national and international conditions. In terms of structure, it examines the norms, values, traditions, organizations, and culture of the military. The course will provide insight into the routine life within the military and contemporary issues confronting the military.

  • Introduction to Cultural Competence
    SOCI335 3 credit hours

    This course presents key concepts in the study of cultures and explores how culture and cultural contexts and language influence values, expectations, behavior, communication styles, and conflict resolution.

Core Curriculum

The core curriculum is comprised of six academic areas and can be successfully completed with the following selection of courses:

Epistemology & Critical Thinking (6 credits)

  • INTD 310

Science & the Scientific Method (6 credits)

  • INTD 320 or SCIE 301 and SCIE 310*

Qualitative Research in the Social & Behavioral Sciences (6 credits)

  • INTD 321* or SOCI 209 and one of the following: ECON 310, POLS 306, POLS, 318, SOCI 335

Critical Theory in Literature & the Humanities (6 credits)

  • ENGL 250 or ENGL 270 and RELG 300

Human Communications & Technology (6 credits)

  • COMM 315 and COMM 301 or COMM 302 or COMM 305

Political, Social & Economic History (6 credits)

  • Any two HIST 3xx or HIST 4xx courses available by the College of Graduate and Continuing Studies
  • Epistemology & Critical Thinking
    INTD310 6 credit hours

    This course introduces students to both historical and contemporary theories of knowledge acquisition and validation. Special emphasis is placed on newer theories of information handling arising from neuroscience and the study of human-computer interaction. The course covers the role of formal and informal logic as a tool for the validation of knowledge.

  • Quantitative Research & The Scientific Method
    INTD320 6 credit hours

    A study of the principles goals and techniques of quantitative research. Topics covered include the espistemology of science; the origins and charateristics of the scientific method; research design and statistical tools; and science and public policy. Emphasis is placed on the ability to recognize valid scientific reasoning and to interpret reports of scientific research in a non-specialist manner. Prerequisite: None.

  • Environmental Science
    SCIE301 3 credit hours

    Most of the world’s crucial environmental issues and many regional conflicts are related to the degradation and/or overuse of the Earth’s basic resources, including air, water, soil, and energy. This course focuses on the physical and chemical processes associated with the degradation of these resources, as well as an examination of potential solutions. The course addresses and integrates into scientific studies two themes that underlie all environmental issues: sustainability and human population dynamics.

  • Qualitative Research in the Social & Behavioral Sciences*
    INTD321 6 credit hours

    The course introduces students to the methods and goals of qualitative research. Emphasis is placed on techniques of qualitative data collection and analysis, with particular focus on ethnographic research and methods of coding data. The course includes an in-depth discussion of biases and the use of triangulation.

  • Methods of Social Science Research
    SOCI209 3 credit hours

    This course examines the methodological foundations of the social sciences; the logic and technique of empirical inquiry; the nature of social facts; the operationalization of concepts and the construction of hypotheses; research designs including questionnaires, interviews, experiments, observation, and evaluation; the organization and analysis of data; graph and table construction and interpretation; the common problems of empirical and social research; and research ethics. Pre-requisites: none.

  • Socio-Economic Studies
    ECON310 3 credit hours

    In this course, you will explore tenets and characteristics of various economics systems, analyze economic indicators, conceptualize problems, and recommend possible solutions. Economic factors are explored in the context of the U.S. Army’s Political-Military-Economics-Social Infrastructure-Information Systems framework.

  • Comparative Politics
    POLS306 3 credit hours

    This course introduces the basic methods, concepts, and substance of comparative politics and focuses on institutions and behaviors as well as development and modernization theories. Issues covered include: the nature of political systems; the different varieties of democracies and authoritarian regimes; and the impact of geography on the political, economic, and social development of a region.

  • Technology-Mediated Communication
    COMM315 3 credit hours

    A study of human communication and the effect of modern technology on it. Students review basic communication theory, including non-verbal and intercultural communication, and then evaluate the impact of technology on the effectiveness and efficiency of communication. Topics include: spoken vs. written communication; synchronous vs. asynchronous communication; the status of world languages on the internet; the impact of social media; modern workplace communication; and trends in the development of communication technology.

  • Business & Professional Writing
    COMM301 3 credit hours

    A writing-intensive course that focuses on critical business and management documents including organizational and personnel performance reports; business proposals; communications with stakeholders; and marketing instruments. Emphasis is on proper use of the business register; audience analysis; and technology-mediated professional communication. Prerequisite: ENGL101 or its equivalent.

  • Data Analysis and Writing
    COMM302 3 credit hours

    Professional literature regularly includes results that are based on statistical analysis. This course is designed to strengthen students’ analytical and communications skills as preparation for a career in law enforcement, intelligence, and security. The course will cover predictive analysis and modeling as well as analytical tools with which to deal with changing events. This course will also help to establish definitions for particular words and concepts and how they might be applied in various situations. Pre-requisite: SOCI209.

  • Strategic Communications
    COMM305 3 credit hours

    This course introduces the principles of strategic communication and provides a detailed understanding of the important role of participatory Web media in strategic communication. Topics include understanding and defining strategic communication, public diplomacy, with whom responsibility lies in conducting strategic communication, challenges of U.S. strategic communication, improving strategic communication, and the future of strategic communication. You will apply the tenets of strategic communication by reviewing and critiquing high-profile cases from the war in Iraq and other significant events. Prerequisites: none.

  • The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
    HIST402 3 credit hours

    A unique feature of the course is its attention to diversity within both the Israeli and Palestinian political communities. This course provides an engrossing exposure to the themes and complexities of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Its focus is historical and conceptual, and requires students to apply their learning through critical evaluation of contemporary events and conditions. Participants learn the conflict’s history and grapple with recurring obstacles to peace, including practical issues of security as well as abstract issues of culture, identity, and religion. Students are required to view the conflict from both national communities’ perspectives and to critically analyze different models for resolving the conflict.

  • American Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century
    HIST425 3 credit hours

    Currently under course development.

  • Historical Studies
    HIST310 3 credit hours

    In this course students will identify strategic considerations which have influenced the outcome of political and military conflict. Topics including the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, the campaigns of Alexander the Great and Napoleon Bonaparte, the Anglo-Afghan wars of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and the rise and fall of empires around the world.

  • History of Diplomacy I
    HIST411 3 credit hours

    This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1648 to 1914. The course focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length.

  • History of Diplomacy II
    HIST412 3 credit hours

    This course provides students with a comprehensive overview and analysis of diplomacy and international relations from 1914 to the present. The course builds on the material covered in HIST 411 – History of Diplomacy I and focuses on the historical foundations of the modern state system and on the effects of globalization and its influence on decision-making in diplomacy. The course is offered three times per year and is eight weeks in length. Prerequisite: HIST 411.

Leadership Studies

The Leadership Studies concentration allows you to explore the fundamentals of leadership, help define leadership styles, as well as the ways in which leaders drive and manage change. Strong attention is paid to the impact of technology and media on leadership.

  • Seminar in Leadership I: Fundamentals
    MNGT401 6 credit hours

    This course focuses on differentiating the conceptual and theoretical aspects and models of leadership and leadership studies. The fundamentals of leadership are taught within the context of present and past leaders, with an emphasis on how to practice these fundamentals in an ethical manner.

  • Seminar in Leadership II: Leadership Styles & EQ
    MNGT402 6 credit hours

    This course provides information about evaluating emotional intelligence, or EQ. Students are given the tools and the opportunity to evaluate their capacities to think about work through the lens of reflection and introspection as a guide to understanding the behavioral aspects of working together and providing customer service.

  • Leadership of Change
    MNGT403 3 credit hours

    A study of change management principles and best practices from a leadership vantage point. Emphasis is on the process of planning for change and the critical role of communication before, during, and after change. Students develop instruments for measuring the impact of change on human and financial resources within organizations.

  • Leadership in a Technology-Driven World
    MNGT404 3 credit hours

    This course focuses on the application of leadership principles toward efforts to manage the impact of modern information and communication technologies on organizations. Topics include: creating and leading a remote workforce; human behavior in technology-mediated work relationships; and ethical issues arising from the use of technology.

Justice Studies

The Justice Studies concentration introduces you to the principles of criminal justice and the relationship between the police, the courts and corrections. Students will explore concepts such as procedural due process, criminology and ethics in criminal justice.

  • Foundations of Criminal Justice
    CRMJ201 3 credit hours

    This course provides a general survey of the principles, systems, and processes of criminal justice. Students will explore conceptions and definitions of crime, criminal law, due process, and the organization and operation of the three basic components of the criminal justice system – the police, the courts, and corrections – both individually and in relationship to one another. Pre-requisites: none.

  • Procedural Due Process
    CRMJ306 3 credit hours

    This course examines the principle that the government must respect all of the legal rights that are owed to a person according to the law. Students will explore and examine procedural due process as it relates to the procedure of arresting and trying persons who have been accused of crimes. Students will also examine specific government actions that may deprive an individual of life, liberty, or property. Overall, the course will address the applications and administration of due process as well as potential abuse. Pre-requisites: none.

  • The Study of Crime
    CRMJ303 3 credit hours

    This course covers the various biological, psychological and sociological types of theory that have been offered to explain the incidence of crime in society. Various types of crime, including violent, property, corporate, political and victimless crimes, methods of studying crime, and characteristics of criminals are also examined.

  • Domestic Terrorism
    POLS316 3 credit hours

    This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of domestic terrorist and extremist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications on political, national security, and legal paradigms. Topics include current and active domestic groups and their organizational structure, philosophies, and networks.

  • Criminal Justice Ethics
    PHLS324 3 credit hours

    This course provides a short introduction to general ethics, with applications to practices and problems in the criminal justice field. It uses the case study method to focus on immediate decisions that involve common, ethical dilemmas faced by criminal justice professionals in the police, courts, and corrections. It also studies a selection of more general issues involving the criminal justice system that are of common public concern, as well as the deeper question of why certain forms of behavior should or should not be criminalized.

  • Immigration Law and Policy
    POLS325 3 credit hours

    This course touches upon the major policy debates currently swirling around immigration reform and policy. Students will examine social changes and the development of immigration law over the last few decades, including the emergence and role of social change movements. Other topics to be explored include undocumented immigration, international coordination on migration, judicial review and due process, refugee and asylum policy, immigration and employment, border security, state and local enforcement of immigration law, and the relationship between immigration law and crime.

Strategic Studies

The Strategic Studies concentration focuses on issues of national security policy, the global intelligence community, international conflict and more. Students who choose this concentration are obligated to closely follow current international events and learn how to discuss them analytically and objectively.

  • Ethics in the Modern World
    PHLS210 3 credit hours

    This course is a study of ethics and its application to problems in everyday life, society, and the broader world. The course examines the principal moral theories and ethical systems that have shaped our personal values and behavior, including consequentialist and non-consequentialist theories, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics. Students explore the connections between ethics and religion and examine the challenges to morals posed by relativism, subjectivism and emotivism, egoism. Students also evaluate positions, theories, and arguments as they apply them to concrete matters of personal, socio-political, and global concern.

  • Global Security and Intelligence
    INSC313 3 credit hours

    This course examines a range of contemporary international issues – from questions of realism versus idealism in foreign affairs to changes in the nation-state, the rise and influence of member states in the Pacific Rim, and overall global security objectives. It will explore the uses of strategic intelligence by world leaders in shaping policy and the effects of strategic intelligence on world events. Students will be required to closely follow international developments and learn how to discuss them objectively and analytically. Areas of emphasis include science, technology, and globalization as the environment in which concepts of international security evolve and change over time. Pre-requisites: none.

  • National Security Policy
    POLS302 3 credit hours

    This course introduces the issues and institutions of national security policy. Students gain an appreciation of strategic thought and strategy formulation, the ability to assess national security issues and threats, and an understanding of the political and military institutions involved in the making and execution of national security policy.

  • International Terrorism
    POLS318 3 credit hours

    This course addresses the effects of a variety of forms of sub-state violence on world affairs. Topics include sources of terrorism, its major characteristics, the problems it poses for global peace and stability, responses to terrorism by countries and international organizations, and the problem of balancing public safety and personal freedom in dealing with terrorism.

  • Insurgency and Conflict
    SSDA315 6 credit hours

    In this course students compare and contrast selected insurgencies and counter-insurgencies from across the globe. Students acquire both broad knowledge and in-depth understanding of the practice of insurgency in various regions and nations.

  • Comparative Politics
    POLS306 3 credit hours

    This course introduces the basic methods, concepts, and substance of comparative politics and focuses on institutions and behaviors as well as development and modernization theories. Issues covered include: the nature of political systems; the different varieties of democracies and authoritarian regimes; and the impact of geography on the political, economic, and social development of a region.

Capstone (6 credits)

All students are required to draw upon at least two different academic disciplines for research methodology, seminal literature and sources, and intellectual frameworks in order to bring an interdisciplinary perspective to this culminating program activity.

*Courses are under development

Admissions

At a Glance

  • An associate degree or minimum of 30 credits
  • Transfer up to 90 credits
  • Multiple start dates per year

Admissions Requirements »

Next Start Date

Monday, October 29, 2018

Application Deadline

Monday, October 1, 2018

Contact Admissions

Monday - Friday: 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. EDT
Extended hours available by appointment

 

Call Admissions: 1-866-684-7237

Email Admissions: bachelors@online.norwich.edu

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    Transfer Credits
    Complete your degree quicker. Receive the equivalent of up to 90 semester credits for training and prior learning that meet specific course requirements.
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    Use of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.
    Military Transcripts
    For those serving in the military, your military transcripts will provide Norwich with the information needed to begin reviewing and evaluating your military experience and training for college credit.
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    What to Expect at Norwich
    From student support to classroom resources to exceptional faculty, Norwich has your online learning experience covered.

Non-Discrimination Statement

Norwich University, in compliance with Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, national origin, age, sex, or physical handicap in any of its policies, practices, or procedures.

Tuition & Fees

Overview

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program is an investment in your future that we can help you manage from a financial perspective. Whatever your individual situation, we can guide you through the financial planning process. Contact our admissions team to learn more.

Tuition at a Glance

  • Credit Hours: 30-90
  • Credits Per Trimester: 3-12
  • Rate Per Credit Hour: $375 or $250 (active military)

2018-19 Tuition and Fee Schedule - Bachelor's Programs

Rate Per Credit Trimester Tuition Additional Expenses Total
$375 or $250 (active military) $750-$4,500

Technology - $150/trimester
Library - $100/trimester
Graduation - $150/one-time

$8,400 - $35,900

Careers & Outcomes

Career Opportunities Through Interdisciplinary Studies

Embarking on an entirely new career path or seeking opportunities for advancement in your current workplace can be daunting, but with the proper skills and preparation, nothing is out of your reach. Increasingly, employers are seeking candidates who not only fulfill requirements specific to the job, but who also possess the core skills that make the difference between an ordinary employee and an extraordinary asset. Through Norwich’s Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies online program, individuals who develop fluency in communication, problem solving, collaboration, critical thinking, and research and analysis may find themselves highly coveted on the open job market, and exceedingly qualified for greater responsibilities in their current roles.

Career Outcomes

Norwich’s online interdisciplinary studies program focuses on developing skills that are perpetually relevant, and universally admired by employers around the world. Thanks to the program’s highly customizable course content and generous concentration offerings, there is no limit to the types of organizations for which students may find themselves working.

Examples of Career Paths

  • Data Analyst
  • Executive Assistant
  • Federal Agent
  • Foreign Ambassador
  • Human Resources Specialist
  • Military officer
  • Production Manager
  • Program Coordinator
  • Project Manager
  • Publisher
  • Public Relations Manager
  • Sociologist
  • Training and Development Specialist

Types of Employers

  • Consulting and research firms
  • Educational institutions and museums
  • Government agencies and contractors
  • Nonprofit organizations
  • Publishing houses
  • Retail companies
  • Research Foundations
  • U.S. military

Faculty & Staff

Join professionals from around the globe and learn from experienced faculty as you complete your degree and open up new professional and personal possibilities for yourself.

Program Director

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Mark L. Parker, PhD

Mark L. Parker is Associate Dean of Continuing Studies and Associate Professor, Interdisciplinary Studies. He has overall responsibility for the College’s online bachelor’s degree completion programs, two of its thirteen online master’s degree programs, and the online graduate Certificate in Teaching & Learning. He is part of the College’s quality control team for online courses and the faculty training and development activities. As Associate Professor he develops and teaches courses in communication, epistemology, and critical thinking. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Florida State University and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. His area of specialization is technology-mediated communication in education and the workplace. In 2010, he was recognized by the University Continuing Education Association “for outstanding contribution to the body of research on distance education” for his work on the experiences of non-native speakers of English in fully online U.S. university courses. A veteran of the U.S. Air Force, he has twenty-five years of experience in higher education teaching and administration.

Meet Mark L. »

Program Staff

seth jackson portrait
Seth Jackson, M.Ed.
Assistant Program Manager
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Alexa  Ward, MA
Enrollment Advisor

Featured Faculty

Faculty

Alumni

Our first graduates of the Interdisciplinary Studies program graduated in 2017. Below are graduates from our bachelor's programs.

My motivation was to be competitive in the workforce following my active duty retirement and to leverage Air Force tuition assistance to help pay for my Norwich degree.


William Seaman
Class of 2015
Bachelor of Science in Strategic Studies and Defense Analysis
portrait of julie

One of the key things to me for having a Norwich education is the name that comes with it; there’s pride and tradition that comes with having a Norwich University diploma. It’s finishing what I started here many years ago and I wanted something I can be proud to hang in my office.


Julie Scribner
Class of 2015
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
portrait of kelley

I have always dreamed about graduating from Norwich University. Going to college was always on my bucket list and this was my motivation.


Kelley Lawrence
Class of 2016
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Online Learning

How do you fit an online program into your busy life?

Norwich has developed online programs that provide a gateway, not a barrier, to maximize your career potential. Get to know a few graduates -- with busy schedules -- and how they made their education fit.

Kim Swasey

I am married and have a wonderful daughter. I love to go out with friends and take advantage of the outdoors.


My background
I am retired from the military and am now working as a contractor for the government.
How I succeeded at Norwich
As I work in the public administration sector as a contractor, I wasn't able to use any government resource to do school work (including my work computer), which meant I did all school work outside of normal working hours. I found the best time for me was very early in the morning when the house was quiet. Another critical piece was camaraderie with my classmates. You can persevere with your support system.

Residency at Norwich

While not required for completing your bachelor's degree, the Residency Conference is a unique educational and social experience that culminates your time at Norwich.

tammy at residency conference

Putting faces with names and realizing that the bonds we developed online instantly transferred to our face-to-face interactions. It was like hanging out with long-lost family and friends.


Tammy Megow-Jones
Class of 2015
Master of Science in Leadership

Resources

Coming Soon.

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